quarantine

[ kwawr-uh n-teen, kwor-, kwawr-uh n-teen, kwor- ]SEE DEFINITION OF quarantine
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR QUARANTINE

The ship only got to the quarantine ground that day, but in the morning we went to sea.

I left the Plato at the quarantine ground, going to the Sailor's Retreat.

Could you persuade them to let us remain in 'Quarantine,' then, for a few days?

But that is impossible, unless you have broken through the quarantine.

For me, I'm sick of havin' folks act like we was a quarantine station.

The first quarantine station of which we hear was established in Venice in 1403.

We parted from the quarantine soldiers, and took a guide for Hebron.

Quarantine was then in force, and, with my fellow-passengers, I was forbidden to land.

A telegram to Quarantine would get him, up to an hour or so after we cast off.

Why should patients with the "diseases of childhood" be placed in quarantine.

WORD ORIGIN

1520s, "period of 40 days in which a widow has the right to remain in her dead husband's house." Earlier quarentyne (15c.), "desert in which Christ fasted for 40 days," from Latin quadraginta "forty," related to quattuor "four" (see four).

Sense of "period a ship suspected of carrying disease is kept in isolation" is 1660s, from Italian quarantina giorni, literally "space of forty days," from quaranta "forty," from Latin quadraginta. So called from the Venetian custom of keeping ships from plague-stricken countries waiting off its port for 40 days (first enforced 1377) to assure that no latent cases were aboard. The extended sense of "any period of forced isolation" is from 1670s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR QUARANTINE

detention

nounconfinement, imprisonment
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.