synonyms
  • definitions

protocols

[ proh-tuh-kawl, -kol, -kohl ]SEE DEFINITION OF protocols

Synonyms for protocols

  • agreement
  • code
  • contract
  • covenant
  • custom
  • obligation
  • pact
  • compact
  • concordat
  • conventions
  • courtesy
  • decorum
  • etiquette
  • formalities
  • manners
  • order
  • politesse
  • propriety
  • treaty
  • good form
  • p's and q's
MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for protocols

  • disagreement
  • bad manners
  • impoliteness
  • rudeness
  • crudeness
  • impropriety
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PROTOCOLS

The Protocols were duly signed and the Convention sent to Paris.

And, if they cannot get it by protocols they get it by invasion and assault.

First of all, then, what do we actually know about the origin of these protocols?

And now for the new version of the history of the protocols.

These acts may take the form of notes, protocols, declarations, etc.

Nilus does not refuse to say how he came by these Protocols.

He stopped on the way in a little town, and gave the protocols to the spy.

He engaged copyists who worked all night and copied the protocols.

These protocols were secretly extracted or were stolen from a whole volume of protocols.

This is the weird, fantastic “thriller” from which sprang the Protocols.

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, as prothogall "draft of a document," from Middle French prothocole (c.1200, Modern French protocole), from Medieval Latin protocollum "draft," literally "the first sheet of a volume" (on which contents and errata were written), from Greek protokollon "first sheet glued onto a manuscript," from protos "first" (see proto-) + kolla "glue."

Sense developed in Medieval Latin and French from "official account" to "official record of a transaction," to "diplomatic document," and finally, in French, to "formula of diplomatic etiquette." Meaning "diplomatic rules of etiquette" in English first recorded 1896, from French; general sense of "conventional proper conduct" is from 1952. "Protocols of the (Learned) Elders of Zion," Russian anti-Semitic forgery purporting to reveal Jewish plan for world domination, first published in English 1920 under title "The Jewish Peril."