opiate

[ noun, adjective oh-pee-it, -eyt; verb oh-pee-eyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF opiate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR OPIATE

It was a luxury so penetrating and powerful that it affected him like an opiate.

But while there's life there's hope, you know; and meantime I'll send you an opiate to relieve the pain.

A strong emetic and a subsequent cathartic; and then an opiate and the bark.

"I will prepare an opiate," said the physician in a whisper.

Her fried chicken and creamed gravy and mashed potatoes had been an opiate.

An overdose of the opiate the doctor was giving her to ease her pain.

A little forcing of her innocence now was necessary as an opiate for her conscience.

When Love is hurt, it is self-love that requires the opiate.

That meant not only the loss of an opiate, but also heavy punishment.

Oh, I ought to have my medicine—not the opiate, but the other.

WORD ORIGIN

"medicine containing opium," early 15c., from Medieval Latin opiatus, from Latin opium (see opium). Figurative sense of "anything that dulls the feelings" is from 1640s. From 1540s in English as an adjective, "made with or containing opium."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR OPIATE

anaesthetics

nounsleep-inducing or numbing drug
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.