Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR OBSESSIONS

Opinions are much divided on the matter of obsessions and possessions of the devil.

Here again the most frequent is the cure of paralytic symptoms and of obsessions.

Like other obsessions, they come to grief in the presence of something real.

Their thoughts are our thoughts, their obsessions, our obsessions.

Like the obsessions of the insane, there is a deadly inevitability in the logic of them.

Since the hour of her earliest childhood she had watched these obsessions and dreaded them.

These obsessions cripple both those who hate and, of course, those who are hated, robbing both of what they might become.

The physicians had ordered her away from the Paris palace, with its gloomy decorations so stimulating to her obsessions.

These oppressions and obsessions, the deadly anxiety, the futile responsibility and the boredom are too much for me.

Those were the obsessions of a pregnant woman, you thought—something she was to be soothed and coddled into forgetting.

WORD ORIGIN

1510s, "action of besieging," from French obsession and directly from Latin obsessionem (nominative obsessio) "siege, blockade, a blocking up," noun of action from past participle stem of obsidere "to besiege" (see obsess). Later (c.1600), "hostile action of an evil spirit" (like possession but without the spirit actually inhabiting the body). Transferred sense of "action of anything which engrosses the mind" is from 1670s. Psychological sense is from 1901.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.