Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR NORTH

I can give you sixty seconds to find that I'm the North Star.

To the North, South, and East nothing but spinifex sand-hills in sight.

Ascended the Frere Ranges and got a fine view to the north and east.

He found the district to the north to be a dreary waste, destitute of food and water.

A party of fugitives were to meet her in a wood, that she might conduct them North.

To us in the North, the African is a comparatively negligible factor.

We left the track to examine a gully to the north, but could not find any water.

"I have a liking for that north countryman," he remarked presently.

They went swiftly with their eyes on the ground by the north gate to the mountain.

To the north lies Thunder Mountain, wall-sided and menacing.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English norð "northern" (adj.), "northwards" (adv.), from Proto-Germanic *nurtha- (cf. Old Norse norðr, Old Saxon north, Old Frisian north, Middle Dutch nort, Dutch noord, German nord), possibly ultimately from PIE *ner- "left," also "below," as north is to the left when one faces the rising sun (cf. Sanskrit narakah "hell," Greek enerthen "from beneath," Oscan-Umbrian nertrak "left"). The same notion underlies Old Irish tuath "left; northern;" Arabic shamal "left hand; north." The usual word for "north" in the Romance languages ultimately is from English, cf. Old French north (Modern French nord), borrowed from Old English norð; Italian, Spanish norte are borrowed from French.

As a noun, c.1200, from the adverb. North Pole attested from mid-15c. (earlier the Arctic pole, late 14c.). North American (n.) first used 1766, by Franklin; as an adjective, from 1770.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR NORTH

northerly

adjectiveboreal
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.