Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MISSES

He misses the mystic hour when ghosts of the green 128 life are about.

He misses his, now that it's rusted so fast that it won't go.

She is—ahem—visiting me and she is attending the Misses Cabot's school.

The Misses Cabot welcomed her with fussy and dignified condescension.

"I think you must be right in that, Rotha—that she misses Ralph," said Willy.

Father is not very well, and mother writes that he misses me.

Her maid has leave of absence this week, and she misses her services.

The Misses Crane were afraid she was going to lose her reason.

You, Nizzo and Ragna, enter the air-lock with Jarl so that if he misses, you can pull him back.

It is only the suggestion of deliberate choice that misses its mark.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English missan "fail to hit, miss (a mark); fail in what was aimed at; escape (someone's notice)," influenced by Old Norse missa "to miss, to lack;" both from Proto-Germanic *missjan "to go wrong" (cf. Old Frisian missa, Middle Dutch, Dutch missen, German missen "to miss, fail"), from *missa- "in a changed manner," hence "abnormally, wrongly," from PIE root *mei- "to change" (root of mis- (1); see mutable). Related: Missed; missing.

Meaning "to fail to get what one wanted" is from mid-13c. Sense of "to escape, avoid" is from 1520s; that of "to perceive with regret the absence or loss of (something or someone)" is from late 15c. Sense of "to not be on time for" is from 1823; to miss the boat in the figurative sense of "be too late for" is from 1929, originally nautical slang. To miss out (on) "fail to get" is from 1929.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.