mezzo

[ met-soh, med-zoh, mez-oh ]SEE DEFINITION OF mezzo

Antonyms for mezzo

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MEZZO

The “Mezzo Cammin” is a line too narrow for their eager steps.

Galli had a mezzo soprano voice, and first appeared at the Opera House.

Sir John Hawkins derives passamezzo from passer, to walk, and mezzo, the middle or half.

We can all think of singers whose natural quality is mezzo—let us say—who try to force the voice up into a higher register.

It is no longer a soprano; it is a mezzo and must be judged by quite different standards.

Francesco has a mezzo voce, which might, by a stretch of politeness, be called baritone.

This passage was now full of poor people, to each of whom, in his passage to St. Peter's, the Pope gave a mezzo grosse.

Why should not the child form a concept of forte and piano, and so get away from the deadly monotony of mezzo?

He married in 1863 the mezzo soprano singer, Amalie Weiss, who died in 1899.

The mezzo termine can only be maintained by armed force—in fact, by conquest!

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.