Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LOANED

I loaned him a two-bit piece, kunnel, an' he tol' me all he knowed!

Her son would never have loaned the money if he had only listened to her.

One of these has been presented to the United States and the other is loaned to the Fair.

I was unarmed––I had loaned my cylinder to the guard in the lower corridor.

And clothed and loaned ten dollars, for which he is more thankful than ever.

She has loaned European governments and peoples some ten milliards of money.

In the meantime I loaned—not gave, but loaned her the money to live upon.

Some Stellar Guard weapon, he thought, that had been loaned to this fellow.

John's right hand gripped the automatic Gibson had loaned him.

She may at any time be loaned, borrowed, sold, or exchanged.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-13c., from Old Norse lan, related to lja "to lend," from Proto-Germanic *laikhwniz (cf. Old Frisian len "thing lent," Middle Dutch lene, Dutch leen "loan, fief," Old High German lehan, German Lehn "fief, feudal tenure"), originally "to let have, to leave (to someone)," from PIE *leikw- "to leave" (see relinquish).

The Norse word also is cognate with Old English læn "gift," which did not survive into Middle English, but its derived verb lænan is the source of lend. As a verb, loan is attested from 1540s, perhaps earlier, and formerly was current, but has now been supplanted in England by lend, though it survives in American English.

Loan word (1874) is a translation of German Lehnwort; loan-translation is attested 1933, from German Lehnübersetzung. Slang loan shark first attested 1900.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.