Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LECTURES

Access to books and lectures comprised all within the bounds of his wishes.

Once I consented to accompany him to one of the lectures he was so fond of attending.

Still his gravity at once returned to him on going in to lectures.

Morse attended these lectures and formed with Dana an intimate acquaintance.

"You'll need a month or two to prepare your lectures," he pointed out.

In these lectures you have seen it only as in flashes from a dark lantern.

My two years at lectures had not been passed in vain, and surgery had been my hobby.

My sole desire is that these lectures should be true juvenile lectures.

I have endeavoured, in a course of lectures at the Sorbonne, to do a part of this work.

Laboratory work by students, together with lectures and quiz sections.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "action of reading, that which is read," from Medieval Latin lectura "a reading, lecture," from Latin lectus, past participle of legere "to read," originally "to gather, collect, pick out, choose" (cf. election), from PIE *leg- "to pick together, gather, collect" (cf. Greek legein "to say, tell, speak, declare," originally, in Homer, "to pick out, select, collect, enumerate;" lexis "speech, diction;" logos "word, speech, thought, account;" Latin lignum "wood, firewood," literally "that which is gathered").

To read is to "pick out words." Meaning "action of reading (a lesson) aloud" is from 1520s. That of "a discourse on a given subject before an audience for purposes of instruction" is from 1530s.