Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR KNOTTED

He gloried in his knotted muscles and the crushing power of his desires.

Her throat was bare, and she saw the muscles of it knotted in the struggle for life.

"You are fatigued," said madame, raising her glance as she knotted the money.

His ruddy English face was knotted in a scowl and his blue eyes were dark.

And if she had not been there, why was her handkerchief found there, knotted in this peculiar way?

It was a cardboard box, tied about with a string, which was knotted in a peculiar way.

The other end of the rope he now knotted very firmly to a mullion.

He knotted the sheet behind, like an apron, and arose to greet the comers.

He clutched the reins in one hand, and with the other knotted them about his wrist.

He was a swarthy creature and round his neck was knotted a handkerchief, vivid red.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English cnotta "intertwining of ropes, cords, etc.," from Proto-Germanic *knuttan- (cf. Low German knütte, Old Frisian knotta "knot," Dutch knot, Old High German knoto, German Knoten, perhaps also Old Norse knutr "knot, knob"). Figurative sense of "difficult problem" was in Old English (cf. Gordian knot). Symbolic of the bond of wedlock, early 13c. As an ornament of dress, first attested c.1400. Meaning "thickened part or protuberance on tissue of a plant" is from late 14c. The nautical unit of measure (1630s) is from the practice of attaching knotted string to the log line. The ship's speed can be measured by the number of knots that play out while the sand glass is running.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR KNOTTED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.