involute

[ adjective, noun in-vuh-loot; verb in-vuh-loot, in-vuh-loot ]SEE DEFINITION OF involute
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR INVOLUTE

But the involute edges of the pileus are bearded with close hairs.

Involute: ridgeless, with flanking lines, but no keel; soft and rather thick.

Involute, in vernation, 72; rolled inwards from the edges, 97.

The margin of the cap is smooth and turned under at first (involute).

The body is ornamented with carelessly drawn, deeply incised, involute designs.

On the sides of the vessel are engraved figures, consisting of clusters of involute lines, as in the specimen just given.

The lines of the involute are arranged in four groups of two each and occupy an unusually wide belt.

The central circle incloses a perforated circlet, and the involute lines are long and shallow.

These names are given to the curves because the end of a stretched thread unwound from the evolute will describe the involute.

Draw setting tangent from “base circle” of involute, at middle of tooth.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., from Latin involutus "rolled up, intricate, obscure," past participle of involvere (see involve).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR INVOLUTE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.