infuriates

[ verb in-fyoor-ee-eyt; adjective in-fyoor-ee-it ]SEE DEFINITION OF infuriates
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR INFURIATES

"This is a wound that infuriates me," said the grand sorcerer.

His moist, soft fingers tremble as he holds the cards, and he infuriates every one by his erratic bidding.

You have engaged scores of cooks in your time and everyone does a certain thing which infuriates me.

It's that that agonizes and infuriates Mercedes, it's that that makes her unwilling to be alone with me.

She looks rather comfortable and seemly to us, but something about her infuriates the bookseller.

The infuriates may expel the Thirty-Two, if they choose, and put them under lock and key.

My one solace is that I do not submit, it infuriates me, I resent it; I will never be resigned and milky.

On the other hand, devotion often exalts, infuriates, and strengthens the passions which formerly animated the converts.

This loyalty offends and infuriates the women of Thracia, who divine in it a spirit inimical to a life in harmony with nature.

The bad air of our theatres and other public places disgusts and infuriates me more, but exhausts me less.

WORD ORIGIN

1660s, from Italian infuriato, from Medieval Latin infuriatus, past participle of infuriare "to madden," from Latin in furia "in a fury," from ablative of furia (see fury). Related: Infuriated; infuriating; infuriatingly.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.