hemoglobin

[ hee-muh-gloh-bin, hem-uh- ]SEE DEFINITION OF hemoglobin
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HEMOGLOBIN

Decrease of hemoglobin, or oligochromemia, is very common and important.

This is a deficiency of hemoglobin, or red corpuscles, or both.

Hemoglobin and red corpuscles are always greatly diminished.

This latter class often have a sluggish circulation, besides a lack of hemoglobin.

The chlorophyll of the leaves and the hemoglobin of the blood are similar in constitution.

Their red blood corpuscles and hemoglobin are distinctly below normal.

The color is mainly due to hemoglobin and other imperfectly elaborated constituents of the blood.

The blood in the tiny arteries was very red—rich in hemoglobin, for a rare atmosphere.

One constituent of hemoglobin, in fact the constituent which gives it its ability to carry oxygen, is the element iron.

If there is enough of the gas present, every molecule of hemoglobin will take up oxygen to its full capacity.

WORD ORIGIN

coloring matter in red blood stones, 1862, shortening of hæmatoglobin (1845), from Greek haimato-, comb. form of haima (genitive haimatos) "blood" (see -emia) + globulin, a type of simple protein, from globule, formerly a word for "corpuscle of blood."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HEMOGLOBIN

blood

nounred body fluid
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.