Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GUT

Skin two or three eels, or some flounders; gut and wash them very clean, cut them into small pieces, and put them into a saucepan.

Take out the meat as whole as possible, split the tail, and remove the gut; and if the inside be not watery, it may be added.

These gut windows have their convenience as well as their inconvenience.

And the brightest sign yet for our future is the increasing demand for hooks and gut.

He covered a probang with the skin of a small eel, or the gut of a lamb or cat.

I noticed that the water in the Gut was rougher than is usual at dawn.

Last week, I saw a policeman standing at the top of the Gut.

The back-door of the Alexandra, which opens on the Gut, is my home comedy.

Let your gut soften in the water before you commence fishing.

He rose, and, taking up the rod, straightened the gut trace.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English guttas (plural) "bowels, entrails," related to geotan "to pour," from PIE *gheu- "pour" (see found (v.2)). Related to Middle Dutch gote, Dutch goot, German Gosse "gutter, drain," Middle English gote "channel, stream." Meaning "abdomen, belly" is from c.1400. Meaning "easy college course" is student slang from 1916, probably from obsolete slang sense of "feast" (the connecting notion is "something that one can eat up"). Sense of "inside contents of anything" (usually plural) is from 1570s. To hate (someone's) guts is first attested 1918. The notion of the intestines as a seat of emotions is ancient (cf. bowel) and probably explains expressions such as gut reaction (1963), gut feeling (by 1970), and cf. guts. Gut check attested by 1976.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GUT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.