Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GREYEST

But she refused to see the matter in any but the greyest light.

It was the greyest of grey days when I arrived at my one-horse terminus.

The long western road is approaching the busiest, greyest, and most populous part of the county—the mining district.

Only the greyest insect could escape the bird; only the greyest bird, en revanche, could surprise and devour the unwary insect.

It was the greyest sort of day, a real January day, with leaden clouds that hung low to the earth.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English græg (Mercian grei), from Proto-Germanic *grisja- "gray" (cf. Old Norse grar, Old Frisian gre, Middle Dutch gra, Dutch graw, Old High German grao, German grau), with no certain cognates outside Germanic. French gris, Spanish gris, Italian grigio, Medieval Latin griseus are Germanic loan-words.

The distinction between British grey and U.S. gray developed 20c. The noun is c.1200, from the adjective. Gray as figurative for "Southern troops in the U.S. Civil War" is first recorded 1863, in reference to their uniform color. Expression the gray mare is the better horse in reference to households ruled by wives is recorded from 1540s. The verb is 1610s (with an isolated instance from late 14c.). Related: Grayed; graying.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.