Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GO STEADY

“But I expect Dick thinks it was worth his while to have to go steady,” said Cresswell.

Not to try and run, not to break out of a walk; to go steady, and yet keep ahead!

He says, 'Be careful, you, of the water-pot; go steady with your syringe.

This puts the minx entirely in my power; le tour est joué; she will now go steady in harness, or I will know the reason why.

By riding slow, I mean taking a pull about three or four lengths from the fence, and getting your horse to go steady and look.

This puts the minx entirely in my power; le tour est jou; she will now go steady in harness, or I will know the reason why.

However, I determined to go steady, and I crept up to a dark thorn-bush and stood still.

WORD ORIGIN

1520s (replacing earlier steadfast), from stead + adjectival suffix -y (2), perhaps on model of Middle Dutch, Middle Low German stadig. Old English had stæððig "grave, serious," and stedig "barren," but neither seems to be the direct source of the modern word. Old Norse cognate stoðugr "steady, stable" was closer in sense.

Originally of things; of persons or minds from c.1600. Meaning "working at an even rate" is first recorded in 1540s. Steady progress is etymologically a contradiction in terms. Steady state first attested 1885; as a cosmological theory (propounded by Bondi, Gold, and Hoyle), it is attested from 1948.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GO STEADY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.