Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GIVE EAR

The Master said, Who would not give ear to a downright word?

Sir Orlando Drought was sounded, and he for a while did give ear to the suggestion.

Why did she ever give ear to her own suggestions, and cravings after wealth and grandeur?

But this give ear to: in all things be submissive to thy father.

And now give ear, if thou wouldst know the origin of Nitetis.

Well, she was worth studying; she had ideas, and could give ear to ideas.

Then she pleads for the simple and the foolish to give ear to her words.

I am sure you do not give ear to anything so foolish, Mrs. Verrall.

For a while she refused to give ear to his protestations, his explanations and his promises.

Not until he was fully satisfied did he give ear to the girls entreaty.

WORD ORIGIN

"organ of hearing," Old English eare "ear," from Proto-Germanic *auzon (cf. Old Norse eyra, Danish øre, Old Frisian are, Old Saxon ore, Middle Dutch ore, Dutch oor, Old High German ora, German Ohr, Gothic auso), from PIE *ous- with a sense of "perception" (cf. Greek aus, Latin auris, Lithuanian ausis, Old Church Slavonic ucho, Old Irish au "ear," Avestan usi "the two ears").

The belief that itching or burning ears means someone is talking about you is mentioned in Pliny's "Natural History" (77 C.E.). Until at least the 1880s, even some medical men still believed piercing the ear lobes improved one's eyesight. Meaning "handle of a pitcher" is mid-15c. (but cf. Old English earde "having a handle"). To be wet behind the ears "naive" is implied from 1914. Phrase walls have ears attested from 1610s. Ear-bash (v.) is Australian slang (1944) for "to talk inordinately" (to someone).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GIVE EAR

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.