etymological

[ et-uh-mol-uh-jee ]SEE DEFINITION OF etymological
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ETYMOLOGICAL

The term in the etymological sense would be applied to Gwen.

It was not phonetic, nor was it etymological; it was simply Ritsonian.

Their etymological origin is in any case the same as if they were nicknames.

This is somewhat of a new departure in etymological dictionaries.

There is really no etymological connection between the two names.

Of all deductions, those drawn from etymological comparisons are, perhaps, the most fallacious.

On grounds equally slight with these have many attempts been made to form conclusions from etymological comparisons.

I and me, thou and ye, stand in no etymological relations to each other.

India had her etymological and her legendary school of mythology.

They are of course not the etymological bases, except sometimes by accident.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., ethimolegia "facts of the origin and development of a word," from Old French et(h)imologie (14c., Modern French étymologie), from Latin etymologia, from Greek etymologia, properly "study of the true sense (of a word)," from etymon "true sense" (neuter of etymos "true, real, actual," related to eteos "true") + -logia "study of, a speaking of" (see -logy).

In classical times, of meanings; later, of histories. Latinized by Cicero as veriloquium. As a branch of linguistic science, from 1640s. Related: Etymological; etymologically.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ETYMOLOGICAL

linguistic

adjectivesemantic
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.