emancipated

[ ih-man-suh-pey-tid ]SEE DEFINITION OF emancipated
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EMANCIPATED

For the fetters which bind us can not be shaken off, before the conscience is emancipated.

More too than in any other of his Dialogues, Plato is emancipated from former philosophies.

In any case, the neighborhood has been emancipated from its worst disadvantages.

He liked the woods because they emancipated him from restraint.

She is an apologist of sublime lewdness, of emancipated human caninity.

John felt as though he had been emancipated from a dreadful drudgery.

He was full of visions and hopes of an emancipated Ireland, and all the glories which should belong to her.

He then moved in 1819 to Edwardsville, Illinois, where he emancipated his slaves.

The first desire of the emancipated slave, generally, is for education.

What is to be done with the slaves when they are emancipated?

WORD ORIGIN

1620s, from Latin emancipatus, past participle of emancipare "declare (someone) free, give up one's authority over," in Roman law, the freeing of a son or wife from the legal authority (patria potestas) of the pater familias, to make his or her own way in the world; from ex- "out, away" (see ex-) + mancipare "deliver, transfer or sell," from mancipum "ownership," from manus "hand" (see manual) + capere "take" (see capable). Related: Emancipated; emancipating. Adopted in the cause of religious toleration (17c.), then anti-slavery (1776). Also used in reference to women who free themselves from conventional customs (1850).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EMANCIPATED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.