Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DERMA

Scleroderma is from two Greek words: scleros, hard; derma, skin.

It is not only admissible, but preferable, not to wound the derma at all.

The true skin, lying beneath the cuticle; also called the derma.

At a later period extravasations of a larger size and more irregular form occur in the deeper layers of the derma.

In the mucous membranes extravasations of greater or less extent may occur, as in the derma.

The proximate cause in both of these conditions is congestion of the vascular rete of the derma.

Derma, or Dermis, is the true skin lying under the epidermis (cuticle), which is known in contrast as the scarf-skin.

Carlos still slept so profoundly that it was necessary for Derma to shake him violently by the arm before he could be aroused.

On its bursting, the blood flowed through the derma or thick skin over a round surface of the diameter of about half an inch.

It enters through small holes in the derma into a subdermal cavity, which separates the membrane from the bulk of the sponge.

WORD ORIGIN

"skin beneath the epidermis," 1706, from Modern Latin derma, from Greek derma (genitive dermatos) "skin," from PIE root *der- "to split, peel, flay" (see tear (v.)).

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.