Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONSCIENCE

Here stands its Government, aware of its might but obedient to its conscience.

But as Mr. Gladstone was then, so he has been all his life—the very Quixote of conscience.

The distinctive principle of the book was that the State had a conscience.

In our own single manhood to be bold, Fortressed in conscience and impregnable.'

Your conscience must tell you that I have the right to do so.

Yes, indeed; I got more by that means, than I should have had the conscience to ask.

Conscience, he said, was the soul's safeguard, and reason the safeguard of the heart and intellect.

Yet, despite her innocence, the world would not let her live according to her own conscience.

For that very reason, she suffered much from a conscience newly clamorous.

For the time being, conscience was muted by gratified ambition.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., from Old French conscience "conscience, innermost thoughts, desires, intentions; feelings" (12c.), from Latin conscientia "knowledge within oneself, sense of right, a moral sense," from conscientem (nominative consciens), present participle of conscire "be (mutually) aware," from com- "with," or "thoroughly" (see com-) + scire "to know" (see science).

Probably a loan-translation of Greek syneidesis, literally "with-knowledge." Sometimes nativized in Old English/Middle English as inwit. Russian also uses a loan-translation, so-vest, "conscience," literally "with-knowledge."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONSCIENCE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.