Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CLEPSYDRA

They had but two measures of time—the clepsydra, or water-clock, and the sun-dial.

Like the sun-dial and the clepsydra, the hour-glass is older than we know.

The principle is the same as that of the simplest form of clepsydra.

The Djyotisha also teaches the art of constructing a clepsydra, or water-clock.

The water-clock, or clepsydra, has been known to the Chinese for centuries.

This water clock was called a clepsydra, the name being taken from two Greek words meaning 'thief of water.'

Each of the sides had a sort of dial, and the building formerly contained a clepsydra or water-clock.

Clepsydra, klep′si-dra, n. an instrument used by the Greeks and Romans for measuring time by the trickling of water.

The Greeks called the water-clock a clepsydra, which means "the water steals away."

In the clepsydra (Fig. 1) the descent of the weight was controlled by the size of the stream of flowing water.

WORD ORIGIN

"ancient Greek water clock," 1640s, from Latinized form of Greek klepsydra, from stem of kleptein "to steal, to hide" (see kleptomania) + hydor "water" (see water (n.1)).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CLEPSYDRA

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.