catenary

[ kat-n-er-ee; especially British kuh-tee-nuh-ree ]SEE DEFINITION OF catenary
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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CATENARY

The versed sine, or deflection of the middle of the catenary, was 50 feet.

The surface formed by revolving the catenary about its directrix is named the alysseide.

The only surface of revolution having this property is the catenoid formed by the revolution of a catenary about its directrix.

One of the most laborious and practically useful works of Giddy was a treatise on the properties of the Catenary Curve.

Not at all: the catenary appears actually every time that weight and flexibility act in concert.

WORD ORIGIN

1872, from Latin catenarius "relating to a chain," from catenanus "chained, fettered," from catena "chain, fetter, shackle" (see chain (n.)). As a noun from 1788 in mathematics. Related: Catenarian.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CATENARY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.