Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BRING UP

There, go you all on the rock, and I will bring up the Mohicans with the venison.

The officer must bring up his family in accordance with his position.

The servants had had the forethought to bring up two lamps with them.

They should do nothing but live and love, cultivate the soil, and bring up their children.

Why, yes, bring up Dr. Schweninger; he can make me well, I am sure.

Richard and the porter will bring up your luggage and the boxes.

And now how strange that he should bring up the subject in her presence!

Romance may have "brought up the nine-fifteen," but it will not bring up potatoes.

Bring up your artillery in the centre, and infantry on the left.

Bring up that third burro; I want to examine these fragments a little.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English bringan "to bring, bring forth, produce, present, offer" (past tense brohte, past participle broht), from Proto-Germanic *brenganan (cf. Old Frisian brenga, Middle Dutch brenghen, Old High German bringan, Gothic briggan); no exact cognates outside Germanic, but it appears to be from PIE root *bhrengk-, compound based on root *bher- (1) "to carry" (cf. Latin ferre; see infer).

The tendency to conjugate this as a strong verb on the model of sing, drink, etc., is ancient: Old English also had a rare strong past participle form, brungen, corresponding to modern colloquial brung. To bring down the house figuratively (1754) is to elicit applause so thunderous it collapses the roof.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BRING UP

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.