Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BRAVEST

I little thought to find him among the bravest of my own chosen chieftains.

It was, indeed, a task which might make the heart of the bravest sink within him.

After a while he would have at the castle a company of the bravest heroes of the earth.

Yes, Siegfried will be the bravest hero the world has ever known.

If the Lenape are so skillful, why is one of their bravest warriors here?

His fear, the kind of fear that the bravest feel, had been driven away by rage.

Bowen, one of the South's bravest generals, was the last to give way.

Bravest and best of children, I thank Heaven that you are rewarded!'

It contained the bravest news: great news, as Hamish expressed it.

I will take only the bravest with me, and I will never return without the prize.'

WORD ORIGIN

late 15c., from Middle French brave, "splendid, valiant," from Italian bravo "brave, bold," originally "wild, savage," possibly from Medieval Latin bravus "cutthroat, villain," from Latin pravus "crooked, depraved;" a less likely etymology being from Latin barbarus (see barbarous). A Celtic origin (Irish breagh, Cornish bray) also has been suggested.

Old English words for this, some with overtones of "rashness," included modig (now "moody"), beald ("bold"), cene ("keen"), dyrstig ("daring"). Brave new world is from the title of Aldous Huxley's 1932 satirical utopian novel; he lifted the phrase from Shakespeare ("Tempest" v.i.183).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.