bohemian

[ boh-hee-mee-uh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF bohemian
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BOHEMIAN

Rather with regret it was I found her to be a Mrs. Kenner, the leader of the Bohemian set.

He had been asked to meet the Bohemian set at a Dutch supper and had gone.

The Bohemian set, such as are possible, will be bound to come over to us.

Well, then, if the Austrians may not be touched, what say you to a Bohemian!

In one corner was a donkey tied up, belonging to the Bohemian.

Of all the merry evenings in the bohemian world, that was one of the merriest.

Among the brasseries in Paris this the most desirable to lovers of the Bohemian brew.

"Nay, nay the day month after he arrives at Vienna," cried the Bohemian.

Heretofore his life had been very similar to that of his Bohemian companions.

She tried to explain what Bohemian meant, and what Bohemia was; but this is what no one can quite do.

WORD ORIGIN

"a gypsy of society," 1848, from French bohemién (1550s), from the country name (see Bohemia). The modern sense is perhaps from the use of this country name since 15c. in French for "gypsy" (they were wrongly believed to have come from there, though their first appearance in Western Europe may have been directly from there), or from association with 15c. Bohemian heretics. It was popularized by Henri Murger's 1845 story collection "Scenes de la Vie de Boheme," the basis of Puccini's "La Bohème." Used in English 1848 in Thackary's "Vanity Fair."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BOHEMIAN

beatnik

noununcoventional, free-sprited person
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.