Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BLACKED OUT

But Dan blacked out, receiving some of the concussion of the exploding rocket.

And what had been blacked out was as a matter of fact very useful to me!

He blacked out as if he'd been a computer suddenly deprived of power.

Perhaps he'd just blacked out for a minute and the kid had gone out the door.

One quarter of the cylinder had been blacked out with paint.

If we're blacked out, I think we can get within two miles with safety.

I think most of us blacked out; I'm sure I did, for a while.

He has a bad headache and he blacked out when he tried to sit up.

They rolled in pain, blacked out and unable to think or fight the underground beasts that poured over them in renewed attack.

Just before he blacked out, he hurled one last accusing thought at Reinhardt.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English blæc "dark," from Proto-Germanic *blakaz "burned" (cf. Old Norse blakkr "dark," Old High German blah "black," Swedish bläck "ink," Dutch blaken "to burn"), from PIE *bhleg- "to burn, gleam, shine, flash" (cf. Greek phlegein "to burn, scorch," Latin flagrare "to blaze, glow, burn"), from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn;" see bleach (v.).

The same root produced Old English blac "bright, shining, glittering, pale;" the connecting notions being, perhaps, "fire" (bright) and "burned" (dark). The usual Old English word for "black" was sweart (see swart). According to OED: "In ME. it is often doubtful whether blac, blak, blake, means 'black, dark,' or 'pale, colourless, wan, livid.' " Used of dark-skinned people in Old English.

Of coffee, first attested 1796. Meaning "fierce, terrible, wicked" is late 14c. The color of sin and sorrow since at least c.1300; sense of "with dark purposes, malignant" emerged 1580s (e.g. black magic). Black face in reference to a performance style originated in U.S., is from 1868. Black flag, flown (especially by pirates) as a signal of "no mercy," from 1590s. Black dog "melancholy" attested from 1826. Black belt is from 1875 in reference to districts of the U.S. South with heaviest African population; 1870 with reference to fertility of soil; 1913 in judo sense. Black power is from 1966, associated with Stokely Carmichael.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BLACKED OUT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.