Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BIRCHED

“Yes, better go back to school and be birched,” sneered Volney.

For this he was taken before the visiting justices and birched.

I'll not be birched four times a week for merely tripping on a word, and have nothing to show for it but stripes.

To be crossed at home, to be birched at school, to work all May-day in the tannery vats, and to be laughed at--it was too much.

A county magistrate, who had sentenced a boy to be birched, wrote in his warrant that the boy was to be floged.

The three boys wandered away as far as Acle, eleven miles from Norwich, whence they were ignomimously brought back and birched.

Take care of your book, cap, and gloves, or youll be birched on your bare bottom.

I hated this, and would rather have been birched secundum artem than to have seen the girls giggling at me.

The victims had first to go out into the woods to gather the branches with which later they were to be birched.

He was birched at school for everybody but himself, for he never deserved it!

WORD ORIGIN

Old English berc, beorc (also the name of the rune for "b"), from Proto-Germanic *berkjon (cf. Old Saxon birka, Old Norse börk, Danish birk, Swedish björk, Middle Dutch berke, Dutch berk, Old High German birihha, German Birke), from PIE *bhergo (cf. Ossetian barz, Old Church Slavonic breza, Russian bereza, Lithuanian beržas, Sanskrit bhurjah, Latin farnus, fraxinus "mountain ash"), from root *bhereg- "to gleam, white." Meaning "bunch of birch twigs used for flogging" (1640s) led to verb meaning "to flog" (1830). Related: Birched; birching. Birch beer is by 1827, American English.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BIRCHED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.