bipartite

[ bahy-pahr-tahyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF bipartite
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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BIPARTITE

Bipartite, bi′part-īt, or bī-prt′īt, adj. divided into two like parts.

It was bipartite, and rather on the incongruous principle discountenanced in the Horatian Epistle to the Pisos.

This important class of bipartite unequal-membered anisometrical stanzas was very much in vogue in the Middle English period.

But as they mostly consist of two quite unequal parts, they certainly stand in a closer relationship to the bipartite stanzas.

But those of six lines may belong either to the bipartite (a a a, a a a) or to the tripartite class (a a, a a, a a).

The bipartite unequal-membered stanzas belong to a more advanced stage in the formation of the stanza.

Most of these stanzas admit of being looked upon as tripartite on account of the bipartite structure of the frons.

A red or a bipartite Umbrella or Parasol is the invariable sign of the umbrella-maker.

In geometry, a bipartite curve consists of two distinct branches (see Parabola, figs. 3, 5).

The style, which varies much in length, is simple, with an undivided or bilobed or bipartite stigma.

WORD ORIGIN

1570s, from Latin bipartitus "divided," past participle of bipartire "to divide into two parts," from bi- (see bi-) + partitus, past participle of partiri "to divide" (see part (v.)).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BIPARTITE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.