barnacle

[ bahr-nuh-kuh l ]SEE DEFINITION OF barnacle
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BARNACLE

My father's not in the way, and won't be in the way to-day,' said Barnacle Junior.

This dashing young Barnacle, in a word, was likely to become a statesman, and to make a figure.

The Barnacle family had for some time helped to administer the Circumlocution Office.

You haven't got any appointment, you know,' said Barnacle Junior.

You stick to us in a devil of a manner,' Said Barnacle junior, looking over his shoulder.

The father of that father who married a Barnacle, married a Joddleby.

The agreeable young Barnacle, and Bar, were the talkers of the party.

This light in hand young Barnacle knew perfectly that it was not.

According to others, the barnacle geese could both run and fly.

He is, so to speak, like a barnacle on a rock in an ocean of conversation.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., "species of wild goose;" as a type of "shellfish," first recorded 1580s. Often derived from a Celtic source (cf. Breton bernik, a kind of shellfish), but the application to the goose predates that of the shellfish in English. The goose nests in the Arctic in summer and returns to Europe in the winter, hence the mystery surrounding its reproduction. It was believed in ancient superstition to hatch from barnacle's shell, possibly because the crustacean's feathery stalks resemble goose down. The scientific name of the crustacean, Cirripedes, is from Greek cirri "curls of hair" + pedes "feet."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BARNACLE

freeloader

nounsomeone who takes advantage
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.