Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ARTERIES

At one time a favorite expression was, A man is as old as his arteries.

They never take a fellow on anything but two arteries for the navy.

Not a drop of blood was found in the veins nor was any found in the arteries or heart.

He can feel all the throbbings of the blood in the arteries.

Then, in jubilant waves, the blood beat back into her arteries.

The brain acts under the impulse of the heart, transmitted by the arteries.

You would have thought my appearance was enough to freeze their veins and arteries.

He began to wear his Arteries on the outside, just like a true son of Albion.

I know there are professors in this country who "ligate" arteries.

The torpor of the heart and arteries is known by the weakness of the pulse.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Anglo-French arterie, Old French artaire (13c.; Modern French artère), and directly from Latin arteria, from Greek arteria "windpipe," also "an artery," as distinct from a vein; related to aeirein "to raise" (see aorta).

They were regarded by the ancients as air ducts because the arteries do not contain blood after death; medieval writers took them for the channels of the "vital spirits," and 16c. senses of artery in English include "trachea, windpipe." The word is used in reference to artery-like systems of major rivers from 1805; of railways from 1850.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.