Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ANGRIER

Would she be sure to recognize any equivocation, and be angrier at that?

But Daedalus, instead of being proud of his nephew, was angrier than before.

A voice inside Francis took part with the old man, and made him yet angrier.

Angry he was at Warboise's disloyalty; angrier at the manner of it.

She was angrier with Cora than she had ever been before since the opening of Pinewood Hall.

Michael will be angry if I don't; but I expect he'll be angrier if I go in these clothes.

And he was angrier than ever when Solomon Own said to him, "It's your turn!"

And he was surprised to find that his remark only made Mr. Crow angrier than ever.

I told him what I thought about things, and I think I made him angrier.

She was angry now, and the longer she thought the angrier she got.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from anger (n.) + -y (2). Originally "full of trouble, vexatious;" sense of "enraged, irate" also is from late 14c. The Old Norse adjective was ongrfullr "sorrowful," and Middle English had angerful "anxious, eager" (mid-13c.). The phrase angry young man dates to 1941 but was popularized in reference to the play "Look Back in Anger" (produced 1956) though it does not occur in that work.

"There are three words in the English language that end in -gry. Two of them are angry and hungry. What is the third?" There is no third (except some extremely obscure ones). Richard Lederer calls this "one of the most outrageous and time-wasting linguistic hoaxes in our nation's history" and traces it to a New York TV quiz show from early 1975.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.