Antonyms for wits

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WITS

She simply lived by her wits, and perhaps by some want of that article in her male friends.

They were bright; there is hardly a street boy living by his wits who isn't.

She went a little pale over her mistakes, but preserved her dignity and her wits.

That he had needed a stimulant that day was because he had been soured and would not try with his wits about him.

But I isn't got all my wits,' says he, the cry-baby; 'an' God knows I'm doin' my best!'

The two blacks were frightened out of their wits; and were of no assistance to me.

He must use his wits; but first he must make sure that the two girls were safe.

In the meantime the captain was at his wits' end to know what course was the best to pursue.

She had bravely striven to keep her fairyhood, and in the battle of wits, had lost.

And if he does go, I'll be at my wits' ends to kape him from settlin' that Jim Barrows.

WORD ORIGIN

"mental capacity," Old English wit, more commonly gewit, from Proto-Germanic *witjan (cf. Old Saxon wit, Old Norse vit, Danish vid, Swedish vett, Old Frisian wit, Old High German wizzi "knowledge, understanding, intelligence, mind," German Witz "wit, witticism, joke," Gothic unwiti "ignorance"), from PIE *woid-/*weid-/*wid- "to see," metaphorically "to know" (see vision). Related to Old English witan "to know" (source of wit (v.)). Meaning "ability to make clever remarks in an amusing way" is first recorded 1540s; that of "person of wit or learning" is from late 15c. For nuances of usage, see humor.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR WITS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.