victories

[ vik-tuh-ree, vik-tree ]SEE DEFINITION OF victories
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR VICTORIES

Some victories are only to be won with arms that hurt the bearer.

The victories of parties in this country have never been by coups d'tat.

The Romans told stories of their defeats as well as of their victories.

The retreat of Moreau was the consequence of the victories of this Prince.

The victories of peace are more glorious than those of war, it is said.

Then, when you see Him winning souls, or hear of your comrades' victories, oh!

The consciousness of a train of great days and victories behind.

Let her but have her own way, she would never flaunt her victories.

Frances, too, seemed to appreciate and enjoy the Yankee victories.

His victories are by demonstration of superiority, and not by crossing of bayonets.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., from Old French victorie, from Latin victoria, from past participle stem of vincere (see victor). V.E. ("victory in Europe") and V.J. ("victory in Japan") days in World War II were first used Sept. 2, 1944, by James F. Byrne, U.S. director of War Mobilization ["Washington Post," Sept. 10, 1944].

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.