Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TRACES

Traces of the French descent which the widow boasted of were apparent in Winnie too.

Of the rest of the fourteen souls on board the Susan, there were no traces.

Here were traces of what Fenton called his "frantic labours."

The action of the plough has often obliterated the traces of ancient barrows.

All traces of many a Norman castle have completely vanished.

Traces of this custom are still found in many country places.

The dogs had devoured even the entrails of the seal, and began to gnaw their traces.

I will believe your mad tales about traces of life in the moon; for that is science.

If he left no traces in the room, you couldn't know he had been there.

Again and again we meet with traces of the older customs of the mother-age.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "to make a plan or diagram," from Old French trasser "delineate, score, trace, follow, pursue" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *tractiare "delineate, score, trace" (cf. Spanish trazar "to trace, devise, plan out," Italian tracciare "to follow by foot"), from Latin tractus "track, course," literally "a drawing out," from past participle stem of trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)).

Meaning "to pass over" (a path, etc.) is attested from late 14c.; that of "track down, follow the trail of" is early 15c., from trace (n.1). Sense of "draw an outline of" is first recorded late 14c. Meaning "copy a drawing on a transparent sheet laid over it" is recorded from 1762. Related: Traced; tracing.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TRACES

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.