Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TAKE ROOT

She had flung a new idea broadcast, and it was beginning to take root.

The circumstances of that meeting had caused it to take root and grow.

Any printed word is like seed; it is liable to take root you know not where.

Jealousy was an alien weed, which could not take root in the benign soil of her nature.

Take out of pot and take root off of it before it gets cold.

Who, then, prepared the soil for the seeds of this idiocy to take root?

They are left for some days to take root, when the grounds are again irrigated.

So they have to fight for an opening in which they can take root and grow up.

The depth of earth was so great, that in it the largest trees might take root.

It is essential that this idea should sink into our life and take root therein.

WORD ORIGIN

"underground part of a plant," late Old English rot, from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse rot "root," figuratively "cause, origin," from Proto-Germanic *wrot (cf. Old English wyrt "root, herb, plant," Old High German wurz, German Wurz "a plant," Gothic waurts "a root," with characteristic Scandinavian loss of -w- before -r-), from PIE *wrad- (see radish (n.), and cf. wort). The usual Old English words for "root" were wyrttruma and wyrtwala.

Figurative use is from c.1200. Of teeth, hair, etc., from early 13c. Mathematical sense is from 1550s. Philological sense from 1520s. Slang meaning "penis" is recorded from 1846. In U.S. black use, "a spell effected by magical properties of roots," 1935. To take root is from 1530s. Root beer, made from the extracts of various roots, first recorded 1841, American English; root doctor is from 1821. Root cap is from 1875.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TAKE ROOT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.