Synonyms for suicide

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SUICIDE

One can only motive and explain this suicide by self-immolating love.

What is to be said about the folly and cowardice of the suicide's act?

This is so not merely in the sense of insanity but of suicide.

In which case I fancy we may look for an attempt at suicide.

Didn't Dr Donne, as good a man as any, I presume, argue on the part of the suicide?'

A man don't make the preparations he did, when he's got suicide on his mind.

It is rarely necessary, however, to go to such an extremity as suicide.

The story that suicide is wrong and immoral is, like other things, to be taken with reservation.

Call it a reconnaissance, call it suicide—one name's just as good as the other.

And some instinct urged him to be silent about his attempt at suicide.

WORD ORIGIN

"deliberate killing of oneself," 1650s, from Modern Latin suicidium "suicide," from Latin sui "of oneself" (genitive of se "self"), from PIE *s(u)w-o- "one's own," from root *s(w)e- (see idiom) + -cidium "a killing" (see -cide). Probably an English coinage; much maligned by Latin purists because it "may as well seem to participate of sus, a sow, as of the pronoun sui" [Phillips]. The meaning "person who kills himself deliberately" is from 1728. In Anglo-Latin, the term for "one who commits suicide" was felo-de-se, literally "one guilty concerning himself."

In England, suicides were legally criminal if sane, but not if judged to have been mentally deranged. The criminal ones were given degrading burial in roadways until 1823. Suicide blonde first attested 1942. Baseball suicide squeeze is attested from 1955.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.