sonant

[ soh-nuh nt ]SEE DEFINITION OF sonant
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SONANT

For 'voiced,' 'sonant,' 'soft,' or 'media' are sometimes used.

Far to the right lay what had once been called (horresco referens) the duckpond, where—Dulce sonant tenui gutture carmen aves.

On the other hand, z as the representative of sonant th, is legitimate in the broken English of a Frenchman.

The rule of surd to surd and sonant to sonant is neglected in most of the factitious specimens of broken English.

Far to the right lay what had once been called (hor resco referens) the duck-pond, where—Dulce sonant tenui gutture carmen aves.

As if the 'internal evidence' of a poem containing no sonant final -e is not enough to condemn it at once.

The language is of late date, and the sonant final -e is decidedly scarce.

Surdimū′tism, the condition of being deaf and dumb; Surd′ity, want of sonant quality.

His hands moved quietly; his voice was clear and sonant; his words were few and polite.

Sonant melliflua hymnorum organa, suavissima angelorum melodia, cantica canticorum mira!

WORD ORIGIN

1846, from Latin sonantem (nominative sonans), present participle of sonare "make a noise," (see sonata). As a noun from 1849.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SONANT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.