Synonyms for singing

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SINGING

Her singing especially seemed to enchant and fascinate the girl.

Several times she dressed the child, singing to him all the time.

Never was I in such a noisy, roystering, singing, lounging place.

Then boys and girls enter dancing and singing a harvest song.

"That is the Pawnees, singing their travel song," said the Buffalo Chief.

Every man was singing or shouting at the full strength of his lungs.

He did not answer her, but his heart was singing inside him.

He began talking to himself, and singing as loud as he possibly could.

Barbara heard them singing, and their song was about the prince who was to come on the morrow.

"Yes, they are singing of the prince in the cathedral," said Barbara, sadly.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English singan "to chant, sing, celebrate, or tell in song," also used of birds (class III strong verb; past tense sang, past participle sungen), from Proto-Germanic *sengwan (cf. Old Saxon singan, Old Frisian sionga, Middle Dutch singhen, Dutch zingen, Old High German singan, German singen, Gothic siggwan, Old Norse syngva, Swedish sjunga), from PIE root *sengwh- "to sing, make an incantation." The criminal slang sense of "to confess to authorities" is attested from 1610s.

No related forms in other languages, unless perhaps it is connected to Greek omphe "voice" (especially of a god), "oracle;" and Welsh dehongli "explain, interpret." The typical Indo-European root is represented by Latin canere (see chant (v.)). Other words meaning "sing" derive from roots meaning "cry, shout," but Irish gaibim is literally "take, seize," with sense evolution via "take up" a song or melody.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SINGING

chant

nounchorus of song
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.