Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SHADOWS

There are plenty of other people ready to fill in the shadows.

Some illusions, and this among them, are the shadows of great truths.

She is living a most unhappy life, and of course she shadows our lives also.

He raised his voice a little, speaking into the shadows where was the group of silent men.

He crossed over, emerging out of the shadows into her enveloping radiance.

There had been a boy in the shadows when he came up the Street.

Joe had left him then, wheeling abruptly off into the shadows.

There we lay among the thorns and the shadows were long in the low sun.

Then, as the shadows lengthened, we started upon our return to camp.

They were quite as anxious for meat--promptly--as anybody, and were as unobtrusive as shadows.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English sceadwe, sceaduwe "the effect of interception of sunlight, dark image cast by someone or something when interposed between an object and a source of light," oblique cases ("to the," "from the," "of the," "in the") of sceadu (see shade (n.)). Shadow is to shade (n.) as meadow is to mead (n.2). Cf. Old Saxon skado, Middle Dutch schaeduwe, Dutch schaduw, Old High German scato, German schatten, Gothic skadus "shadow, shade."

From mid-13c. as "darkened area created by shadows, shade." From early 13c. in sense "anything unreal;" mid-14c. as "a ghost;" late 14c. as "a foreshadowing, prefiguration." Meaning "imitation, copy" is from 1690s. Sense of "the faintest trace" is from 1580s; that of "a spy who follows" is from 1859.

As a designation of members of an opposition party chosen as counterparts of the government in power, it is recorded from 1906. Shadow of Death (c.1200) translates Vulgate umbra mortis (Ps. xxiii:4, etc.), which itself translates Greek skia thanatou, perhaps a mistranslation of a Hebrew word for "intense darkness." In "Beowulf," Gendel is a sceadugenga, a shadow-goer, and another word for "darkness" is sceaduhelm. To be afraid of one's (own) shadow "be very timorous" is from 1580s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SHADOWS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.