Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SET UP

"To set up as reformers would be to have the whole hive about our ears," she said.

Could they not set up five archers for the honor of Aquitaine and of Gascony?

But we cannot set up a pendulum to swing at the pole of the earth.

Jack Mallet and I, also, set up a shop, on a capital of three dollars.

One end was brought into each main-chain, and set up by tackles.

Daniel Claus had set up a pack of hounds, equal in breed to Sir William's.

The three stones were set up to keep chariots out of the forum.

The headstone, set up by the parson, bore the words "Peccator Maximus."

As it is, I must set up for myself and become a maitresse femme.

I set up now, when he goes by, so's I can hear him when he rides back.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English settan (transitive) "cause to sit, put in some place, fix firmly; build, found; appoint, assign," from Proto-Germanic *(bi)satjan "to cause to sit, set" (cf. Old Norse setja, Swedish sätta, Old Saxon settian, Old Frisian setta, Dutch zetten, German setzen, Gothic satjan), causative form of PIE *sod-, variant of *sed- "to sit" (see sit (v.)). Also cf. set (n.2).

Intransitive sense from c.1200, "be seated." Used in many disparate senses by Middle English; sense of "make or cause to do, act, or be; start" and that of "mount a gemstone" attested by mid-13c. Confused with sit since early 14c. Of the sun, moon, etc., "to go down," recorded from c.1300, perhaps from similar use of the cognates in Scandinavian languages. To set (something) on "incite to attack" (c.1300) originally was in reference to hounds and game.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SET UP

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.