salmagundi

[ sal-muh-guhn-dee ]SEE DEFINITION OF salmagundi

Antonyms for salmagundi

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SALMAGUNDI

I'm glad I didn't, though a lot of the Salmagundi men go over there and like it.

This is very simple jesting, but at that time it was very effective in a town that enjoyed the high spirits of Salmagundi.

He became a friend of W. Irving, and was part author with him of Salmagundi—a continuation of which by himself proved a failure.

They had caviare now, and salmagundi, and sausage and cheese, besides salad and fruit and biscuit and cake.

In 1820 Salmagundi says that "one of the editors of the Port Folio was discharged—for writing common-sense."

Washington Irving's first literary adventure was the publication of Salmagundi.

I called it the Salmagundi, which means anything made out of spare parts.

A feeling crept over me, one not unlike the feeling I'd had when I realized that they'd turned poor old Salmagundi into a traitor.

They had caviar now, and salmagundi, and sausage and cheese, besides salad and fruit and biscuit and cake.

This Aunt Sarah made frequently, being a frugal housewife, and called "Salmagundi."

WORD ORIGIN

1670s, from French salmigondis (16c.), originally "seasoned salt meats" (cf. French salmis "salted meats"), from Middle French salmigondin (16c.), of uncertain origin; Watkins derives it from Latin sal "salt" + condire "to season, flavor." Probably related to or influenced by Old French salemine "hodgepodge of meats or fish cooked in wine," which was borrowed in Middle English as salomene (early 14c.). Figurative sense of "mixture of various ingredients" is from 1761; it was the title of Washington Irving's satirical publication (1807-08). In dialect, salmon-gundy, solomon-gundy..

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SALMAGUNDI

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.