Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SACKING

I had it at the sacking of Issodun, and the King himself hath not such a bed.

I wish I had the sacking of your town; I would repay you, my children!'

I would not for the sacking of London go through with it again.'

The sacking with which he was covered, and his legs, were thickly covered with snow.

I know he was thinking of sacking one of the subs, and he might take you on.

As he jerked to clear it from the sacking, I glanced at little Miss Wallace.

The Scandinavians move about at their ease, sacking London and the other towns.

He took part in the sacking of Quiloa, and in all the events of that campaign.

And in that minute Quentin lifted the sacking, and looked out.

Be this as it may, the sacking of Colchester was a terrible business.

WORD ORIGIN

"large bag," Old English sacc (West Saxon), sec (Mercian), sæc (Old Kentish) "large cloth bag," also "sackcloth," from Proto-Germanic *sakkiz (cf. Middle Dutch sak, Old High German sac, Old Norse sekkr, but Gothic sakkus probably is directly from Greek), an early borrowing from Latin saccus (also source of Old French sac, Spanish saco, Italian sacco), from Greek sakkos, from Semitic (cf. Hebrew saq "sack").

The wide spread of the word is probably due to the Biblical story of Joseph, in which a sack of corn figures (Gen. xliv). Baseball slang sense of "a base" is attested from 1913. Slang meaning "bunk, bed" is from 1825, originally nautical. The verb meaning "go to bed" is recorded from 1946. Sack race attested from 1805.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SACKING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.