rococo

[ ruh-koh-koh, roh-kuh-koh ]SEE DEFINITION OF rococo

Synonyms for rococo

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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ROCOCO

So we cleaned and adorned ourselves and groped our way to the Rococo.

Helen and I are economising; so the other evening we dined at the Rococo.

In this, as in Hamlet, there are the rococo excrescences—yourselves, let us say.

The stitch illustrated in fig. 87 is known as rococo stitch.

In France the preference was for rococo and 191Mansard forms.

The prototype of the German salon naturally was the salon of the rococo period.

They are of mahogany and have the rococo ornaments peculiar to this style.

Most of its buildings are old, reflecting the rococo architecture of an earlier day.

But Chaplin had likewise the other qualities of the rococo painter.

Variations on a Rococo Theme, for violoncello and orchestra.

WORD ORIGIN

1836, "old-fashioned," from French rococo (19c.), apparently a humorous alteration of rocaille "shellwork, pebble-work" from Middle French roche "rock," from Vulgar Latin *rocca "stone." Specifically of furniture or architecture of the time of Louis Quatorze and Louis Quinze, from 1841. If this is correct, the reference is to the excessive use of shell designs in this lavish style. For differentiation, see baroque. The general sense of "tastelessly florid or ornate" is from 1844.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ROCOCO

baroque

adjectivedecorative, especially architecture
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.