Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BAROQUE

An early letter from Rome had a good deal to say about the Baroque.

The architecture is Gothic, with many traces of Baroque and Mudjar art.

The body is constructed of a baroque pearl; the tail terminates in a point.

The church is gray limestone, like the residence, with a baroque faade.

True, the beauty of baroque had not been discovered in his day.

Only it isn't Moorish; it's Baroque—and a very good example.

There is hardly an Italian city that would not be poorer for the absence of the Baroque.

The church was, however, remodelled in 1676, and the interior is baroque.

In phrases of baroque convolution, he conveyed the message of his heart.

Both the Gothic and Baroque designs could only be used in rooms of their own respective styles.

WORD ORIGIN

1765, from French baroque (15c.) "irregular," from Portuguese barroco "imperfect pearl," of uncertain origin, perhaps related to Spanish berruca "a wart."

Klein suggests the name may be from Italian painter Federigo Barocci (1528-1612), a founder of the style. How to tell baroque from rococo, according to Fowler: "The characteristics of baroque are grandeur, pomposity, and weight; those of rococo are inconsequence, grace, and lightness." But the two terms often used without distinction for styles featuring odd and excessive ornamentation.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BAROQUE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.