retake

[ verb ree-teyk; noun ree-teyk ]SEE DEFINITION OF retake
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR RETAKE

Orders had been received to retake Bazeilles at every cost, and drive the Bavarians into the Meuse.

No attempt was made to retake the town, for there could be no profit in gaining what could not be held.

"The Zouaves are to retake the village, with the bayonet," he said.

A little later the place where the retake was to be made was reached.

An enemy might at any moment appear, and not only retake the prize, but themselves.

“We must go off at once in the gig and retake the ship,” said Gregory sternly.

“I wonder whether she will attempt to retake the Swift,” said Captain Brine.

An attempt was made to retake it, but the boys held their ground.

What would you do, Jerry, if you perceived them rushing aft to retake the vessel?

He told her how Frank had persuaded him to try to retake Victoire with the law's help.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-15c., "to take back," from re- "back, again" + take (v.). Meaning "to recapture" is recorded from 1640s; sense of "to record a second time" is attested from 1962. Related: Retook; retaking; retaken. As a noun from 1918; figurative use from 1937.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR RETAKE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.