renascence

[ ri-nas-uh ns, -ney-suh ns ]SEE DEFINITION OF renascence
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR RENASCENCE

It is easy to say, "But the period of the Renascence closed, its glory died away."

For what he saw was England of the Renascence; England passing from the mediæval to the modern.

The great Renascence might have been liberal with its liberal education.

Such an advance in our conceptions took place after the Renascence.

It was the new birth, the regeneration (renascence) of the world.

The gorgeous colours and jewels of the Renascence disappeared.

The age of the Renascence was passing into the age of Puritanism.

All this peaceful beauty of Nature's renascence was nothing to her.

I was not disappointed when the first scene disclosed a loggia of a Renascence palazzo.

His views were eventually corrected by the Renascence anatomists.

WORD ORIGIN

"rebirth; state of being reborn," 1727, from renascent + -ence. As a native alternative to The Renaissance, first used in 1869 by Matthew Arnold. Related: Renascency (1660s).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR RENASCENCE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.