renaissance

[ ren-uh-sahns, -zahns, -sahns, ren-uh-sahns, -zahns, -sahns; especially British ri-ney-suhns ]SEE DEFINITION OF renaissance
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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR RENAISSANCE

It was a topic of interest to the scholars of the Renaissance.

With the beginning of the Renaissance the Middle Ages came to an end.

On the other side is the "Gate of Honor," a good specimen of the Renaissance.

The writers of the Renaissance directly imitated the ancients.

The renaissance classics may be studied in the works of Woodward and Laurie.

Nicolas was the first of the French renaissance artists to come to Portugal.

Yes; he had worshipped at the shrine of the Beautiful; he had prated of the Renaissance.

For me, I am all heart, all art, like there never was in all the history of the Renaissance.

He might well have added, the Renaissance and the pseudo-classicism of a later day.

The choir stalls are of oak, carved in the best manner of the Renaissance.

WORD ORIGIN

"great period of revival of classical-based art and learning in Europe that began in the fourteenth century," 1840, from French renaissance des lettres, from Old French renaissance, literally "rebirth," usually in a spiritual sense, from renastre "grow anew" (of plants), "be reborn" (Modern French renaître), from Vulgar Latin *renascere, from Latin renasci "be born again, rise again, reappear, be renewed," from re- "again" (see re-) + nasci "be born" (Old Latin gnasci; see genus).

An earlier term for it was revival of learning (1785). In general usage, with a lower-case r-, "a revival" of anything that has long been in decay or disuse (especially of learning, literature, art), it is attested from 1872. Renaissance man is first recorded 1906.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR RENAISSANCE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.