realness

[ ree-uh l, reel ]SEE DEFINITION OF realness
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR REALNESS

It's a little contest in relative approximations to realness.

Its oppositions are no part of its realness; and therefore they can be overcome.

They impress the world with a sense of their courage and realness.

That is, I knew in my mind, but I never imagined the realness of what would happen.

It ticks away companionably, as if to reassure me of its realness.

And I make not even the intellect side of this book, which is a Realness to me, without sweet fine sweatings of blood.

The realness of that sacrifice of His stands out very vividly in the intensity of His feelings, of which we get only glimpses.

The odor from burning joss sticks will contribute to the realness of the affair.

These papers have a realness about them, which have their weight against any suspicions, however strong.

Science is the attempt to awaken to realness, wherein it is attempt to find regularity and uniformity.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., "actually existing, true;" mid-15c., "relating to things" (especially property), from Old French reel "real, actual," from Late Latin realis "actual," in Medieval Latin "belonging to the thing itself," from Latin res "matter, thing," of uncertain origin. Meaning "genuine" is recorded from 1550s; sense of "unaffected, no-nonsense" is from 1847.

Real estate is first recorded 1660s and retains the oldest English sense of the word. Noun phrase real time is early 19c. as a term in logic and philosophy, 1953 as an adjectival phrase; get real, usually an interjection, was U.S. college slang in 1960s, reached wide popularity c.1987.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR REALNESS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.