prodigal

[ prod-i-guhl ]SEE DEFINITION OF prodigal

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PRODIGAL

Who, think you, does more injustice, a prodigal man or a saving man?

Swine were the natural companions of the prodigal, and the sooner he was with them the better!

Here, too, are the ironies whereof departed life is prodigal.

But for her Paula would not have returned, like the Prodigal son, to the father's house.

I am prodigal enough at times, but I will not part with such a treasure as that.

It is the love of a mother to her prodigal son that makes her pray for him.

The company is not prodigal of foot-warmers, that's certain!

I was received there with all the welcome it was possible for a prodigal son to be.

Mr. Cripps called me his 'prodigal daughter,' and Mrs. Cripps prayed over me.

She read of the prodigal son, and of Him who would not condemn the woman that was a sinner.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-15c., a back-formation from prodigality, or else from Middle French prodigal and directly from Late Latin prodigalis, from Latin prodigus "wasteful," from prodigere "drive away, waste," from pro- "forth" (see pro-) + agere "to drive" (see act (v.)). First reference is to prodigial son, from Vulgate Latin filius prodigus (Luke xv:11-32). As a noun, "prodigal person," 1590s, from the adjective (the Latin adjective also was used as a noun).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PRODIGAL

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.